Case

JBC

Belgian clothing chain JBC sets great store by sustainable entrepreneurship. They want to incorporate corporate social responsibility into their entire business. 

In 2013, JBC was the first Belgian retailer to sign The Bangladesh Accord on Fire and Building Safety. The Accord is an international agreement between several retailers, brands, trade unions and NGO’s, who vow to work towards a safer Bangladeshi garment industry.

Since 2015, JBC is a proud member of the Fair Wear Foundation. Every company that joins the FWF agrees to its code of conduct, implements the working conditions that are described in the code, and agrees to regular monitoring by the FWF to ensure an actual improvement in terms of working conditions (JBC-jaarverslag 2014). JBC’s code of conduct is firmly based on that of the FWF. 

JBC has a large offer of certified biological cotton and each year they make a point of launching a GOTS-certified collection.

2014 was another ‘pioneer year’ for JBC, the first Belgian brand ever to launch a cradle to cradle certified collection, REVIVE, consisting of thirteen pieces designed for amateur sporting. Cradle to cradle means producing and consuming without harming people or the environment, turning waste into resources, all the while making responsible use of energy sources (JBC-jaarverslag 2014).

In addition, twice a year JBC collects clothes that are no longer worn. Those that are still wearable escape destruction and get a second life.

Morever, JBC has been a faithful organizer of various projects in collaboration with partners like Think Pink, Damiaanactie, Flagbag, Ondernemers voor Ondernemers, Designers Against AIDS, and others.

Last but not least, JBC teams up with VintyKids for a unique pilot project, namely: giving kids' clothes a new life on the second-hand market after their original owners have grown out of them.

related cases