Case

Belgian Company

Whether Belgian Company (BC) designs items for men or for women, they design them with tons of passion. The brand, which operates from Antwerp, prides itself on its high-quality, honest and hybrid clothes with subtle sporty accents. BC is all about striking a balance between style and functionality, opting for natural materials that are both strong and soft and that last longer than just one season.

BC only uses fabrics produced in-house and dyed and treated by a Portuguese manufacturer with a ISO 9001:2008 certificate, which lays down strict requirements for the organization’s quality management system. Together with this certified partner, BC is continually looking for improvements and environmentally friendly alternatives. Some of their goals are transporting little to no air and transporting everything in one go whenever possible. In short: the label invests heavily in a responsible production process that tries to keep people and planet happy.

The fabrics that play the lead role in this process are not your average materials. For starters, each and every one of them is OEKO-Tex certified. The OEKO-Tex label guarantees that the fabrics contain no harmful materials whatsoever, no matter the stage of the production process. In other words, this applies to the raw materials, the intermediate products as well as the finished products. And what’s more: BC swears by high-end finishes and longevity. That’s why the brand works for instance with extra strong overlocks, a maximum number of stitches per centimeter and reinforced splits.

BC also sells directly to end users, making it a point to explain how they can get the most out of their clothes. For example, the brand advises its customers to soak their clothes in a mixture of water and vinegar for half a day before washing them for the first time. This helps to preserve their color. Another golden tip from BC: wash your clothes at 30 degrees and hang them to dry. This way, you can enjoy them for a longer time and you reduce your ecological footprint. What’s not to like!

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